Does Your Talcum Powder Cause Cancer?

Posted by Anapol Weiss on Oct 3, 2016 11:41:50 AM

According to recent reports, women are increasingly limiting their use of talcum powder products such as Johnson and Johnson Baby Powder and Shower to Shower after a connection was found between the products and ovarian cancer.  An increasing number of women are pursuing legal action against the manufacturers.

Research dating back to 1971 found traces of talc in ovarian and cervical tumors.  And, since then, according to the New York Times, “numerous studies have linked genital talc use to ovarian cancer, including a report earlier this month that among African-American women, genital use of powder is linked with a 44 percent increased risk for invasive epithelial ovarian cancer.” 

Juries have already sided with plaintiffs suing talcum powder manufacturers on two occasions, resulting in multi-million dollar damages being awarded.

The Anapol Weiss Unsafe Drugs team believes that drug companies must be held accountable when they fail to caution the public about dangerous side effects like ovarian cancer.  No patient should ever be blindsided by a life-threatening illness or disability caused by an over-the-counter product.

If you have any questions or concerns relating to talcum powder and potential links to ovarian cancer, Greg_spizer_Anapol_Weiss_Attorney.jpgplease do not hesitate to contact Anapol Weiss Shareholder Greg Spizer who is one of the leaders on our Unsafe Drugs team. 

 

 

 

Topics: Unsafe drugs, Product Liability

Blood Thinner Xarelto Side Effects Include Excessive Bleeding Risk

Posted by Anapol Weiss on Sep 22, 2016 1:00:40 PM

Xarelto (rivaroxaban), is a popular blood thinner prescribed to patients for atrial fibrillation and to prevent blood clots. Unfortunately, many patients experience side effects including excessive bleeding, stomach pain, and blood in their urine, among other negative reactions. 

Making Xarelto even more dangerous is the fact that no antidote exists to stem potentially fatal excessive bleeding. Without an antidote, additional severe side effects of excessive bleeding from Xarelto include cerebral hemorrhaging, strokes caused by bleeding in the brain, and gastrointestinal bleeding. 

Anapol Weiss’ Unsafe Drug Team, which is co-led by Shareholder Greg Spizer, has been at the forefront of Greg_spizer_Anapol_Weiss_Attorney.jpgefforts to hold drug makers accountable for injuries caused by Xarelto. Greg’s team believes that no patient should ever be blindsided by a life-threatening illness or disability caused by a prescription medication.

If you or someone you know has taken Xarelto and you have questions relating to the potential risks, please contact Greg Spizer today. 

 

Topics: Unsafe drugs, Xarelto

Questions about Prevacid and Possible Kidney-Related Side Effects

Posted by Anapol Weiss on Jun 9, 2016 2:22:11 PM

Studies have linked certain popular stomach acid medication with a very dangerous risk. Anapol Weiss Partner Tracy Finken answers a few important questions about these drugs and what patients can do.

Prevacid and other proton pump inhibitors have been in the news a lot lately. What’s going on?

Two population-based analyses published in January 2016 associated proton pump inhibitors, or PPIs, with an increased risk for developing chronic kidney disease. The results indicate that the ten-year absolute risk among the 16,900 baseline PPI users studied was 15.6 percent, and the expected risk for non-PPI users was 13.9 percent. Beyond their link between the disease and PPI use, the researchers note that 25 percent of long-term PPI users could discontinue therapy without developing symptoms.

A few months later, more research was published that links these drugs to an increased risk of kidney problems. This study used data from the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs. The researchers found that patients who took PPIs had a 96 percent increased risk of developing kidney failure and a 28 percent increased risk of chronic kidney disease – compared to patients who took histamine H2 receptor blockers instead.

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What is chronic kidney disease?

Chronic kidney disease involves the gradual loss of kidney function. Many kidney specialists use a system involving stages to describe the progress of the disease. During Stage 1, for example, patients may not experience any symptoms. In contrast, Stage 5 is considered end-stage renal disease, because patients’ kidneys can’t adequately function without undergoing dialysis or a kidney transplant.

Are there other risk factors for kidney disease?

Yes. More than 10 percent of adults in the United States are at some stage of chronic kidney disease, also called CKD. There are other risk factors for the condition, such as kidney infection, obesity, and diabetes. About one in three adults with diabetes has CKD as well as one in five adults with high blood pressure.

What should I do?

Do not change or stop any treatment without consulting with your doctor first to determine what’s best. This information is not meant to replace medical advice. Patients should always speak with their health care provider before making decisions about their health.

Contact our firm for assistance if you’ve been diagnosed with kidney disease after taking Prevacid or another PPI drug for an extended period of time. Speaking with an experienced drug lawyer right away can protect your legal rights; it can also be the first step toward making the manufacturer take responsibility for failing to warn PPI users about this life-threatening risk.

Topics: Unsafe drugs, Proton Pump Inhibitors

Second Study Shows More PPI Dangers

Posted by Anapol Weiss on Apr 15, 2016 3:13:16 PM

More research has linked popular stomach acid medications to an increased risk of developing deadly kidney problems. A study published on April 14 in the Journal of the American Society of Nephrology comes on the heels of another study linking these drugs to acute interstitial nephritis as well as chronic kidney disease (CKD).

PPI_side_effects_CKD.pngUsing data from the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs, researchers found that patients who took proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) had a 96 percent increased risk of developing kidney failure and a 28 percent increased risk of CKD compared to patients who took histamine H2 receptor blockers instead.

Deadly Kidney-Related PPI Side Effects

PPIs are a widely used class of drugs with brand names such as Nexium, Prilosec, Prevacid and Protonix. Two population-based analyses published in JAMA Internal Medicine in January 2016 also associated the drugs with an increased risk for chronic kidney disease.

An estimated 15 million Americans take prescription PPI drugs, but they can also be purchased over-the-counter, meaning the total number of users is likely much higher. These drugs, which reduce the production of stomach acid, are typically taken to treat gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), heart burn, peptic or stomach ulcers, and damage to the lower esophagus caused by acid reflux.

Chronic kidney disease involves the gradual loss of kidney function. The condition can progress to end-stage kidney failure, which is fatal unless a patient undergoes dialysis or a kidney transplant. Patients might have made a different decision about using these medications had they known about these PPI side effects, but the news has come too late for some.

Learn More about Filing a Prilosec, Prevacid or Nexium Lawsuit

Contact our firm for assistance if you took a PPI drug and are suffering from severe kidney disease. We can investigate your situation and answer any legal questions you have.

 

Topics: Unsafe drugs, Proton Pump Inhibitors

Lifestyle Changes to Improve GERD Symptoms

Posted by Anapol Weiss on Mar 14, 2016 3:30:00 PM

Many people experience occasional heartburn and acid reflux, but these conditions are a chronic problem for some. Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is a chronic digestive disease involving the flow of stomach acid into the esophagus, which irritates and damages the esophagus lining.

Most people can manage discomfort related to GERD with lifestyle changes and over-the-counter medication. Mayo Clinic offers a few tips including:

  • Maintaining a healthy weight, as excess pounds put pressure on your abdomen and can push acid into your esophagus
  • Avoiding tight clothing, which can also put pressure on your abdomen and the lower esophageal sphincter
  • Eating less to avoid overeating
  • Waiting at three hours after eating before lying down or going to bed
  • Quitting smoking, as smoking decreases the function of the lower esophageal sphincter
  • Elevating the head of your bed to help reduce reflux while you sleep
  • Avoiding foods and drinks that trigger heartburn such as fatty foods, tomato sauce, alcohol, chocolate, mint, garlic, onion and caffeine
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Warning for Those who Take Proton Pump Inhibitors

A popular class of stomach acid drugs called proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) – including Nexium, Prilosec and Prevacid – has been associated with an increased risk of chronic kidney disease (CKD), according to two population-based analyses published in JAMA Internal Medicine in January 2016. PPI drugs are used by millions of people to treat GERD as well as stomach ulcers and other conditions.

People who took PPI drugs over an extended period of time and were diagnosed with CKD likely have questions about who is legally responsible and if there is possible compensation for related expenses and financial and personal losses. We can help. Contact our firm for assistance.

This information is not to replace medical advice given by a physician. Patients should always speak with their health care provider before making decisions about their health.

 

Topics: Unsafe drugs

Acid Reflux Medications May be Overprescribed

Posted by Anapol Weiss on Feb 29, 2016 11:30:00 AM

An estimated 15 million Americans use prescription and over-the-counter proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) such as Nexium, Prilosec and Prevacid. However, mounting research has associated these drugs with a number of adverse effects and suggests that the drugs may be overprescribed.

PPIs are used to treat and prevent gastric acid-related conditions. The drugs prevent acid production in the stomach by blocking the acid-producing enzyme system in the stomach wall. Lack of stomach acid prevents new ulcers from forming, and existing ulcers can heal.

PPIs are FDA-approved to treat and maintain the following conditions in adults, according to a 2013 list by the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services:

  • Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD)
  • Erosive esophagitis
  • Duodenal ulcers
  • Pathological hypersecretory conditions including Zollinger-Ellison syndrome
  • Risk reduction for gastric ulcer associated with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs
  • Eradication of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) to reduce the risk of duodenal ulcer recurrence, in combination with antibiotics

Prilosec_Prevacid_Overprescribed.jpgThe U.S. Food and Drug Administration has indicated that in contrast to the prescription versions, over-the-counter PPIs come in lower doses and are only intended for a 14-day treatment up to three times per year. A 2008 article published in the British Medical Journal cited numerous studies that show PPIs are overprescribed worldwide in both primary and secondary care.

Prevacid, Prilosec and Other PPIs Linked to Chronic Kidney Disease

A recent study involving more than 250,000 people has associated PPI use with an increased risk for chronic kidney disease (CKD), which involves the gradual loss of kidney function. CKD can progress to end-stage renal failure (ESRD), which is fatal unless a patient undergoes dialysis or a kidney transplant.

Patients diagnosed with CKD may have made a different choice about their treatment of gastric conditions had they known PPIs could potentially cause irreversible kidney damage. If it happened to you or a loved one, we can answer your legal questions. Contact our firm for assistance. You can also learn more about PPIs here.

This information is not intended to replace medical advice given by a physician. Patients should always speak with their health care provider before making decisions about their health.

 

Topics: Unsafe drugs

Causes of Chronic Kidney Disease

Posted by Anapol Weiss on Feb 2, 2016 11:30:00 AM

More than 10 percent of adults in the United States have chronic kidney disease (CKD), which involves the gradual loss of kidney function. That’s more than 20 million people with varying stages of the disease, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

There are numerous risk factors and causes of chronic kidney disease, such as diabetes and high blood pressure. Approximately one in three adults with diabetes has CKD as well as one in five adults with high blood pressure.

Causes_of_CKD.jpgOther risk factors for CKD include:

  • Kidney infection
  • Obesity
  • Blockages of the renal artery
  • Lupus
  • A family history of CKD
  • Adverse effects of certain medications

A widely used class of stomach acid drugs called proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) has been associated with an increased risk of CKD, according to two population-based analyses published in JAMA Internal Medicine in January 2016. PPI drugs – with popular brands like Nexium, Prilosec and Prevacid – are used by millions of people to treat gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), stomach ulcers and other conditions.

People who took PPI drugs over an extended period of time and were diagnosed with CKD likely have questions about who is legally responsible and if there is possible compensation for medical bills, loss of work and other financial and personal losses. We can help. Contact our firm for assistance.

Topics: Unsafe drugs, Proton Pump Inhibitors

Proton Pump Inhibitors Linked to Adverse Effects, May be Overprescribed

Posted by Anapol Weiss on Jan 27, 2016 3:30:00 PM

More than 15 million Americans used proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) such as Prevacid, Prilosec and Nexium in 2013 to treat gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), ulcers, and other stomach acid-related issues. However, a serious and life-threatening side effect was recently associated with PPIs, which are among the most commonly used drugs in the world.

PPIs.jpgAn analysis of medical records from more than 250,000 patients linked PPI use to a 20 to 50 percent greater risk of developing chronic kidney disease. People who took PPI drugs twice daily had a higher risk than those who took them once a day, according to the study published in JAMA Internal Medicine on January 11.

Studies have indicated that not only are PPIs associated with a number of adverse effects, but they are also overprescribed worldwide. A 2008 study suggested that as many as 70 percent of patients taking PPIs have no appropriate indication.* Overprescribing PPI drugs is a “…a problem in clinical practice and needs further attention,” another study urged.**

Chronic kidney disease involves the gradual loss of kidney function. Patients may need to undergo dialysis or a kidney transplant if the condition progresses to end-stage kidney failure.

Contact our firm if you took a PPI drug over an extended period of time and are suffering from chronic kidney disease. We can answer any legal questions you have. Please note that patients should never stop using a prescribed drug before talking to their physicians.

*Forgacs, I., & Loganayagam, A. (2008). Overprescribing proton pump inhibitors. BMJ: British Medical Journal, 336(7634), 2-3. doi:10.1136/bmj.39406.449456.BE.
** Vakil, N. (2012). Prescribing Proton Pump Inhibitors. Drugs, 72(4), 437-445. doi:10.2165/11599320-000000000-00000.

Topics: Unsafe drugs

Chronic Kidney Disease and Acid Reflux Medication

Posted by Anapol Weiss on Jan 25, 2016 3:30:00 PM

Chronic kidney disease is a condition that worsens over the course of months or years as a person’s kidneys lose their ability to function properly.

People with chronic kidney disease may not have noticeable symptoms until kidney function has greatly declined, according to an article by Medline Plus. Symptoms of advanced kidney damage may include:

  • Bone pain
  • Changes in skin color
  • Bad breath
  • Blood in the stool
  • Difficulty concentrating
  • Drowsiness and/or sleep problems
  • Easy bruising
  • Excessive thirst
  • Fluid retention and swelling of extremities
  • Frequent hiccups
  • Loss of appetite
  • Muscle twitching and/or muscle cramps
  • Sexual function problems
  • Shortness of breath
  • Vomiting

Patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) need to undergo dialysis or a kidney transplant, as their kidneys are no longer able to remove enough waste and excess fluid from the body.

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An increased risk of chronic kidney disease has been associated with a class of drugs called proton pump inhibitors (PPIs), which reduce the production of acid made by glands in the stomach. These drugs are typically taken to treat gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), peptic or stomach ulcers, and damage to the lower esophagus caused by acid reflux.

If you took a PPI drug over an extended period of time and were diagnosed with chronic kidney disease, you may have questions about who is legally responsible and if there is possible compensation for medical bills, loss of work and other financial and personal losses. We can investigate your situation and get answers to your legal questions.

Topics: Unsafe drugs, Proton Pump Inhibitors

National Birth Defects Prevention Month

Posted by Anapol Weiss on Jan 25, 2016 11:30:00 AM

January is National Birth Defects Prevention Month and a great time to raise awareness about avoiding preventable factors that can leave an unborn baby with lifelong health problems.

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A baby is born with a birth defect every four and a half minutes in the U.S., according to the National Birth Defects Prevention Network (NBDPN). Further, birth defects are the most common cause of death in infants and the second most common cause of death in children up to four years of age. Public awareness and expert medical care are essential in decreasing these staggering statistics, the NBDPN urges.

Birth defects include (but are not limited to):

  • Congenital heart defects
  • Cleft lip and cleft palate
  • Defects of the brain, spine, bones, muscles and internal organs
  • Genetic syndromes such as Down syndrome

Some birth defects only briefly affect a baby’s health, while others are permanent and/or life-threatening.

The risk for many types of birth defects can be reduced through healthy lifestyle choices and proper medical care. Unfortunately, certain drugs have been found to pose dangerous risks to unborn babies when taken during pregnancy, and mothers are not always warned in time. For example, studies have linked Zofran use during pregnancy with an increased risk of cleft palate and congenital heart defects.

It’s important to make good choices to reduce your baby’s risk of developing birth defects. If you took Zofran during pregnancy and your baby was harmed, you may not have received warning in time to make an informed decision. Contact our firm for assistance if it happened to you.

Topics: Unsafe drugs

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