Questions about Prevacid and Possible Kidney-Related Side Effects

Posted by Anapol Weiss on Jun 9, 2016 2:22:11 PM

Studies have linked certain popular stomach acid medication with a very dangerous risk. Anapol Weiss Partner Tracy Finken answers a few important questions about these drugs and what patients can do.

Prevacid and other proton pump inhibitors have been in the news a lot lately. What’s going on?

Two population-based analyses published in January 2016 associated proton pump inhibitors, or PPIs, with an increased risk for developing chronic kidney disease. The results indicate that the ten-year absolute risk among the 16,900 baseline PPI users studied was 15.6 percent, and the expected risk for non-PPI users was 13.9 percent. Beyond their link between the disease and PPI use, the researchers note that 25 percent of long-term PPI users could discontinue therapy without developing symptoms.

A few months later, more research was published that links these drugs to an increased risk of kidney problems. This study used data from the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs. The researchers found that patients who took PPIs had a 96 percent increased risk of developing kidney failure and a 28 percent increased risk of chronic kidney disease – compared to patients who took histamine H2 receptor blockers instead.

Prevacid.png

What is chronic kidney disease?

Chronic kidney disease involves the gradual loss of kidney function. Many kidney specialists use a system involving stages to describe the progress of the disease. During Stage 1, for example, patients may not experience any symptoms. In contrast, Stage 5 is considered end-stage renal disease, because patients’ kidneys can’t adequately function without undergoing dialysis or a kidney transplant.

Are there other risk factors for kidney disease?

Yes. More than 10 percent of adults in the United States are at some stage of chronic kidney disease, also called CKD. There are other risk factors for the condition, such as kidney infection, obesity, and diabetes. About one in three adults with diabetes has CKD as well as one in five adults with high blood pressure.

What should I do?

Do not change or stop any treatment without consulting with your doctor first to determine what’s best. This information is not meant to replace medical advice. Patients should always speak with their health care provider before making decisions about their health.

Contact our firm for assistance if you’ve been diagnosed with kidney disease after taking Prevacid or another PPI drug for an extended period of time. Speaking with an experienced drug lawyer right away can protect your legal rights; it can also be the first step toward making the manufacturer take responsibility for failing to warn PPI users about this life-threatening risk.

Topics: Unsafe drugs, Proton Pump Inhibitors

Second Study Shows More PPI Dangers

Posted by Anapol Weiss on Apr 15, 2016 3:13:16 PM

More research has linked popular stomach acid medications to an increased risk of developing deadly kidney problems. A study published on April 14 in the Journal of the American Society of Nephrology comes on the heels of another study linking these drugs to acute interstitial nephritis as well as chronic kidney disease (CKD).

PPI_side_effects_CKD.pngUsing data from the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs, researchers found that patients who took proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) had a 96 percent increased risk of developing kidney failure and a 28 percent increased risk of CKD compared to patients who took histamine H2 receptor blockers instead.

Deadly Kidney-Related PPI Side Effects

PPIs are a widely used class of drugs with brand names such as Nexium, Prilosec, Prevacid and Protonix. Two population-based analyses published in JAMA Internal Medicine in January 2016 also associated the drugs with an increased risk for chronic kidney disease.

An estimated 15 million Americans take prescription PPI drugs, but they can also be purchased over-the-counter, meaning the total number of users is likely much higher. These drugs, which reduce the production of stomach acid, are typically taken to treat gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), heart burn, peptic or stomach ulcers, and damage to the lower esophagus caused by acid reflux.

Chronic kidney disease involves the gradual loss of kidney function. The condition can progress to end-stage kidney failure, which is fatal unless a patient undergoes dialysis or a kidney transplant. Patients might have made a different decision about using these medications had they known about these PPI side effects, but the news has come too late for some.

Learn More about Filing a Prilosec, Prevacid or Nexium Lawsuit

Contact our firm for assistance if you took a PPI drug and are suffering from severe kidney disease. We can investigate your situation and answer any legal questions you have.

 

Topics: Unsafe drugs, Proton Pump Inhibitors

What is End-Stage Renal Disease?

Posted by Anapol Weiss on Feb 15, 2016 3:30:00 PM

Chronic kidney disease (CKD) involves the gradual loss of kidney function – the process responsible for filtering waste and excess water from the blood. When patients are diagnosed with end-stage kidney disease or end-stage renal disease (ESRD), their kidneys are not functioning well enough on their own to meet the needs of daily life. Patients with ESRD have less than 10 to 15 percent of normal kidney function.

ESRD.jpgA physician may perform one or more of the following tests to diagnose ESRD:

  • Blood test
  • Urine test
  • Renal ultrasound
  • Kidney biopsy
  • Computed tomography scan (CT scan)

Patients with ESRD or severe symptoms often undergo dialysis either at a center or in their home. Dialysis takes over kidney function by removing waste and fluid from the blood. Laboratory tests will help patients and their physicians decide when dialysis should begin. Dialysis does not cure ESRD, but it helps patients feel better and live longer, according to Johns Hopkins Medicine.

Some patients with ESRD undergo kidney transplant surgery. While dialysis is not a cure for ESRD, a new kidney can take over the function of the failed kidneys. Patients who undergo a kidney transplant will need to take medication for the rest of their lives in order to keep the transplanted kidney healthy, the University of California San Francisco Medical Center explains.

When ESRD Could Have Been Prevented

Two population-based analyses published in January 2016 have associated a class of stomach acid drugs called proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) with an increased risk of CKD. PPIs reduce the production of acid made by the stomach glands and include brand names such as Prevacid and Nexium.

Patients who took PPI drugs and developed kidney disease could now be facing ESRD. They would have likely made a different decision with their physician about their medication had they been warned of these dangers, but now it’s too late.

Contact our firm for assistance if you took a PPI drug over an extended period of time and are suffering from severe or end-stage kidney disease. We can investigate your situation and answer any legal questions you have.

Topics: Proton Pump Inhibitors, PPI

The Stages of Chronic Kidney Disease

Posted by Anapol Weiss on Feb 8, 2016 11:30:00 AM

Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a progressive condition that involves the gradual loss of kidney function. Many kidney specialists use a system involving stages to describe patients’ symptoms as the disease progresses, according to the National Kidney Center.

stages_of_ckd.jpgStage 1

90% Kidney Function

Most people do not know they have stage 1 CKD, as they may not experience any symptoms. However, factors such as abnormally high levels of creatinine or urea in the blood, blood in the urine or evidence of kidney damage in an MRI, CT scan or ultrasound could show stage 1 CKD.

Stage 2

60% to 89% Kidney Function

Patients may still be symptom-free during stage 2, but some people start having problems with high blood pressure.

Stage 3

40% to 59% Kidney Function

Symptoms such as fluid retention, swelling of the extremities, changes in urination and kidney pain may appear during stage 3. As stage 3 progresses, patients often see a nephrologist to discuss their condition and a treatment plan to keep their kidneys working as long as possible.

Stage 4

15% to 29% Kidney Function

Stage 4 involves severely reduced kidney function. A patient with stage 4 CKD will likely need dialysis or a kidney transplant in the near future. During stage 4, a person may develop complications such as high blood pressure, anemia, bone disease, or cardiovascular diseases.

Stage 5

Less Than 15% Kidney Function

Stage 5 is also referred to end-stage renal disease (ESRD). When a patient’s CKD has reached stage 5, his or her kidneys cannot adequately function without dialysis or a kidney transplant.

An increased risk of chronic kidney disease has been associated with a widely-used class of drugs called proton pump inhibitors (PPIs), which are typically taken to treat ulcers and conditions such as gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). Popular brands of PPIs include Prevacid, Protonix, Nexium and Prilosec.

If you took a PPI drug over an extended period of time and were diagnosed with chronic kidney disease, you may have questions about who is legally responsible and if there is possible compensation for medical bills, loss of work and other financial and personal losses. We can investigate your situation and answer any legal questions you have. Contact our firm for assistance.

This information is not to replace medical advice given by a physician. Patients should always speak with their health care provider before making decisions about their health.

 

Topics: Proton Pump Inhibitors

Causes of Chronic Kidney Disease

Posted by Anapol Weiss on Feb 2, 2016 11:30:00 AM

More than 10 percent of adults in the United States have chronic kidney disease (CKD), which involves the gradual loss of kidney function. That’s more than 20 million people with varying stages of the disease, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

There are numerous risk factors and causes of chronic kidney disease, such as diabetes and high blood pressure. Approximately one in three adults with diabetes has CKD as well as one in five adults with high blood pressure.

Causes_of_CKD.jpgOther risk factors for CKD include:

  • Kidney infection
  • Obesity
  • Blockages of the renal artery
  • Lupus
  • A family history of CKD
  • Adverse effects of certain medications

A widely used class of stomach acid drugs called proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) has been associated with an increased risk of CKD, according to two population-based analyses published in JAMA Internal Medicine in January 2016. PPI drugs – with popular brands like Nexium, Prilosec and Prevacid – are used by millions of people to treat gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), stomach ulcers and other conditions.

People who took PPI drugs over an extended period of time and were diagnosed with CKD likely have questions about who is legally responsible and if there is possible compensation for medical bills, loss of work and other financial and personal losses. We can help. Contact our firm for assistance.

Topics: Unsafe drugs, Proton Pump Inhibitors

Chronic Kidney Disease and Acid Reflux Medication

Posted by Anapol Weiss on Jan 25, 2016 3:30:00 PM

Chronic kidney disease is a condition that worsens over the course of months or years as a person’s kidneys lose their ability to function properly.

People with chronic kidney disease may not have noticeable symptoms until kidney function has greatly declined, according to an article by Medline Plus. Symptoms of advanced kidney damage may include:

  • Bone pain
  • Changes in skin color
  • Bad breath
  • Blood in the stool
  • Difficulty concentrating
  • Drowsiness and/or sleep problems
  • Easy bruising
  • Excessive thirst
  • Fluid retention and swelling of extremities
  • Frequent hiccups
  • Loss of appetite
  • Muscle twitching and/or muscle cramps
  • Sexual function problems
  • Shortness of breath
  • Vomiting

Patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) need to undergo dialysis or a kidney transplant, as their kidneys are no longer able to remove enough waste and excess fluid from the body.

chronic_kidney_disease.png

An increased risk of chronic kidney disease has been associated with a class of drugs called proton pump inhibitors (PPIs), which reduce the production of acid made by glands in the stomach. These drugs are typically taken to treat gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), peptic or stomach ulcers, and damage to the lower esophagus caused by acid reflux.

If you took a PPI drug over an extended period of time and were diagnosed with chronic kidney disease, you may have questions about who is legally responsible and if there is possible compensation for medical bills, loss of work and other financial and personal losses. We can investigate your situation and get answers to your legal questions.

Topics: Unsafe drugs, Proton Pump Inhibitors

Use of Popular Stomach Acid Drugs Linked to Chronic Kidney Disease Risk

Posted by Anapol Weiss on Jan 22, 2016 10:30:00 AM

PPI_and_CKD.jpgA widely used class of stomach acid drugs called “Proton pump inhibitors” (PPIs) have been associated with an increased risk for chronic kidney disease, according to two population-based analyses published in JAMA Internal Medicine in January 2016.

An estimated 15 million Americans take PPI drugs, which reduce the production of acid made by the stomach glands. These drugs are typically taken to treat gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), peptic or stomach ulcers, and damage to the lower esophagus caused by acid reflux.

PPIs, which are both prescribed and purchased over-the-counter, are well-known and include brand names such as:

  • Nexium
  • Prilosec
  • Prevacid
  • Protonix

Chronic kidney disease involves the gradual loss of kidney function. The condition can progress to end-stage kidney failure, which is fatal unless a patient undergoes dialysis or a kidney transplant.

Contact our firm for assistance if you took a PPI drug over an extended period of time and are suffering from severe kidney disease. We can investigate your situation and answer any legal questions you have.

Topics: Unsafe drugs, Proton Pump Inhibitors

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